Lello Musso Pola 5030 Commercial Ice Cream Maker

Lello Musso Pola 5030 commercial ice cream machineAt $1,199.99 US dollars, or £907.00, the Musso Pola 5030 is a commercial batch ice cream maker aimed predominantly at restaurants and cafes. It makes excellent quality ice cream that is dense, smooth, and creamy but it is not without its faults. Is this machine a good buy for the home cook? My opinion is yes, if cost isn’t an issue. Let’s have a look.

This review will discuss 1. the stainless steel construction; 2. amazon’s ice cream machines best sellers list; 3. the impressive 2 quart, or 1.5 litre, capacity; 4. the freezing time; 5. the burning rubber smell; 6. the central pin issue; 7. cleaning; 8. the dasher; 9. the noise level; 10.the quality of the ice cream; and 11. my conclusion.

1. Stainless steel construction
One of the first things I noticed about this machine when perusing amazon was the ‘Made in Italy’ bullet-point. My first reaction was “Hmm, must be a quality product”. Then I opened the box after it was delivered and my first reaction was “Hmm, a quality product”.

The all stainless steel construction does certainly make this machine look impressive. The ice cream dasher and the bolt that fixes it to the machine are also made of stainless steel and both look durable. The only bits of plastic that you find on the exterior of the machine are the freezer bowl lid, the timer dial, and the freeze and churn buttons.

The second thing I noticed, after the excruciating pain, was just how heavy this machine is: it weighs an impressive 32kg, or 72 pounds. It is quite large for a counter-top machine and you will need to make sure that you have enough room in your kitchen to store it: the dimensions are 20 x 14 x 12.2 inches.

The stainless steel finish and its weight certainly get a big thumbs up from me.

Lello Musso pola 5030 commercial ice cream maker2. A best seller?
It doesn’t always follow that a best selling item is a quality one but I do think that it is useful to look at what other ice cream enthusiasts are up to when deciding which ice cream machine to invest in. The Musso Polla 5030 is currently 9th in amazon’s ice cream machines best sellers list. Here is a list of the top 10 best selling ice cream machines on amazon.com:

  1. Cuisinart ICE 30BC Pure Indulgence 2-Quart Automatic Frozen Yogurt, Sorbet, and Ice Cream Maker
  2. Cuisinart ICE-21 Frozen Yogurt, Ice Cream, & Sorbet Maker
  3. Nostalgia Electrics ICMP400BLUE 4-Quart Electric Ice Cream Maker
  4. Cuisinart ICE-100 Compressor Ice Cream and Gelato Maker
  5. Cuisinart ICE-45 Mix It In Soft Serve 1-1/2-Quart Ice Cream Maker, Whitev
  6. Hamilton Beach 68330R 4-Quart Automatic Ice-Cream Maker, White
  7. MaxiMatic EIM-506 Elite Gourmet 6-Quart Old-Fashioned Pine-Bucket Electric/Manual Ice-Cream Maker
  8. DeLonghi GM6000 Gelato Maker with Self-Refrigerating Compressor
  9. Lello Musso Pola 5030 Desert Maker
  10. Lello 4080 Musso Lussino 1.5-Quart Ice Cream Maker

3. 1.5 litres of ice cream per batch
The Musso Pola 5030 has a large 3 litre, or 4 quart, bowl, which allows you to make an impressive 1.5 litres, or 2 quarts, of ice cream at a time. Most domestic ice cream machines, bar the Cuisinart ICE 30, only have the capacity to make a maximum of 1litre of ice cream at a time.

The freezer bowl is built into the stainless steel housing and cannot be removed. The theory is that having a bowl that is built into the machine enhances the heat conduction from the bowl to the compressor, which should decrease the time it takes for the ice cream mix to freeze. This is important because the longer a mix spends in a machine, the bigger the ice crystals are likely to grow and the sandier the texture is likely to be.

The in-built compressor means that it is possible to make one batch of ice cream after another. Lello claim that the Musso Pola 5030 can make ‘up to 6 quarts of ice cream an hour’ but I find this statement a little misleading. Realistically, I think that it is possible to make 3 litres, or 4 quarts, of excellent-quality ice cream per hour if you are making the same flavour (making different flavours usually means that you have to clean the machine in between flavours).

During testing, it took me about 15 minutes to pre-chill the freezer bowl before I added the mix.  A 1500g mix took 25 minutes to churn and it took about a minute to empty the machine once it had finished. Churning another 1500g took 25 minutes with another minute to empty the machine. It took me 1 hour and 7 minutes to make 3 litres, 4 quarts, of ice cream.

Lello Musso Pola 5030 commercial ice cream machine4. Freezing time
In my first test, I pre-chilled the freezer bowl for 15 minutes by leaving the machine running with the compressor switched on before I added the mix. This ensures that the freezer bowl gets as cold as possible before the mix is added, which should reduce the time it takes to churn a batch of ice cream. It then took an impressive 13 minutes to churn a 1000g batch to a thick and creamy consistency.

In my second test, I again pre-chilled the freezer bowl for 15 minutes and it took 25 minutes to churn a 1500g batch. Although the 1500g batch took longer, the consistency of the ice cream was exactly the same as the first 1000g batch: both were dense and extremely smooth and creamy.

This 13 minute freezing time compares well to the larger Emery Thompson CB-350 (the Cristiano Ronaldo of ice cream machines) commercial batch ice cream machine, which takes only 8 minutes to churn a 6 quart batch. The Musso Polla 5030 freezes a batch of ice cream faster than the Cuisinart ICE100 (40 minutes for a 900g mix) and the Breville BCI600XL Smart Scoop (30 minutes for a 732g mix), both of which are domestic ice cream machines with in-built compressors.

Again, the time it takes a machine to freeze a batch of ice cream is extremely important because the quicker a batch is frozen, the smoother and creamier the texture is likely to be.

The large 1.5 litre bowl and the impressive 13-minute churn time are the two points that have most impressed me about this machine.

5. Burning rubber smell
An issue I have had with this machine is the burning rubber smell that develops at around 26 minutes of churning a 1500g batch; I have had this issue on two consecutive occasions. After checking the instruction manual, I noticed ‘To avoid breaking the drive gear, do not let the ice cream harden excessively‘.

What I found surprising was that the drive gear on this commercial ice cream machine struggled after 26 minutes when the consistency was firm but not yet excessively hard. This issue does lead me to wonder whether the 5030 will be able to cope with the constant churning of 1500g batches in a busy commercial environment.

The Lello Musso Pola 5030 does make ice cream with exceptionally smooth and creamy texture after 25 minutes and I do think this issue can be minimised by ensuring that a large 1500g batch isn’t left in the machine for any longer than 26 minutes. I only encountered this problem when I churned a 1500g batch. I did not notice a burning rubber smell when I churned a 1000g mix for 30 minutes.

6. The central pin
I have also had an issue with preventing ice cream from dripping onto the central pin on which the dasher sits. The instruction manual tells you to ‘not get the central pin wet’ but I found this next to impossible when emptying the machine. This is an issue because there is a gap between the central pin and the solid plastic that surrounds it. If ice cream gets in this gap and hardens, it will add stress to the motor. I have read a review on amazon where hardened ice cream between the central pin and the hard plastic caused the drive gear to fail. In the same review, however, the user does also state that ‘The machine has been running for 10+ years’, which is good to read.

Lello Musso Pola 5030 commercial ice cream machineTo help prevent getting any ice cream on the central pin, it is a good idea to remove the dasher, once the ice cream has been churned, and screw the stainless steel bolt back onto the central pin before emptying the ice cream. This will act as a protective layer and help keep any ice cream from reaching the central pin.

If you notice that ice cream has got into the gap and hardened, use a fine pin or toothpick to scape off as much of the hardened mix as you can.

I do find the central pin issue a bit disappointing and a design flaw that you would not expect on a commercial machine this expensive. However, it is also an issue that can be avoided.

7. Cleaning
I have found cleaning and emptying the Musso Pola 5030 extremely easy. Once the machine has finished churning, it is important to switch off both the dasher and the compressor to ensure that the ice cream doesn’t freeze to the bowl whilst you are emptying it. The large bowl means that there is plenty of space to easily manoeuvre a big wooden spoon to empty the ice cream.

The first time I cleaned the machine, I waited 10 minutes after I had emptied the ice cream and then started wiping it down with a wet sponge. This wasn’t quite long enough for the freezer bowl to warm up sufficiently as the water that I had on the sponge froze to the bowl, making cleaning more difficult.

I then waited a further 10 minutes for the freezer bowl to warm up and had no further issues with water freezing the bowl. It is therefore a good idea to leave the ice cream machine turned off for about 20 minutes before you start wiping it down with a wet sponge.

It is also a good idea to remove as much of the ice cream mix as you can with a spatula before you leave the freezer bowl to warm up for 20 minutes. Once the freezer bowl has warmed sufficiently, it takes a further 5 minutes to clean with a wet sponge, some washing up liquid, and some kitchen towels to dry.

All in all, I have found emptying and cleaning the machine very easy.

Lello Musso pola 5030 commercial ice cream machine8. The dasher
The Musso Polla 5030 comes with an impressive stainless steel dasher that looks well-built and durable. It also comes with a heavy bolt that is used to fix the dasher to the machine.

When you fix in the dasher with the bolt, it sits very closely to the side of the the freezer bowl. This is very important because when your ice cream mix comes in contact with the bowl, it freezes to the side. The dasher scrapes this frozen mix and incorporates it into the rest of the mix. If there is a large gap between the side of the bowl and the dasher, a layer of ice starts to build up there. This layer then acts as an insulator, slowing the transfer of heat from the mix to the bowl. This will, in turn, increase the time it takes for your mix to freeze. Anything that lengthens the time the mix spends in the machine is detrimental  to your chances of making smooth and creamy ice cream because the longer a mix spends in the machine, the larger the ice crystals are likely to grow and the sandier the texture is likely to be.

For the price of this machine, I would have liked to have seen a spring loaded dasher, similar to that found in the more expensive Emery Thompson CB 350 commercial batch machine. The strong spring in the CB350 pushes the dasher firmly against the side of the bowl and ensures that no ice gets frozen there. A spring-loaded dasher would certainly be a good addition to a future Lello model.

Lello musso pola 5030 commercial ice cream machineLello Musso pola 5030 commercial ice cream maker9. Noise level
The machine is incredibly quiet when churning a batch of ice cream. I have noticed that it starts to make a slight noise after about 25 minutes when the motor starts to struggle with the hardened ice cream. I haven’t found the noise this machine makes an issue.

10. The quality of the ice cream
Coming on to the most important question ‘Does the Musso Pola 5030 make good quality ice cream? My short answer is yes, absolutely. I found that with a 1000g batch, it made excellent-quality ice cream that was dense and had a very smooth and creamy texture. The dasher’s design and relatively low revolutions per minute, the Lello Musso Pola 5030 doesn’t incorporate a lot of air into the mix, resulting in a nice dense ice cream. I haven’t measured the amount of air this machine incorporates during the churning process but I would guess it to be somewhere between 30-40%.

The machine produced equally dense, smooth, and creamy ice cream, when it was filled to maximum capacity with a 1500g batch.

lelo musso pola 5030 commercial ice cream makerlello musso pola 5030 commercial ice cream maker11.Conclusion
Would I recommend this machine to the restaurant or cafe owner? Yes, absolutely. I think this would be a good machine for the restaurant or cafe owner to start with to try the concept before moving on to a larger machine once demand increases.

Would I recommend this machine to the home cook? Yes, but only if money isn’t an issue. If money isn’t an issue and if making a lot of ice cream in a short period of time is your priority, then this commercial machine with an in-built compressor would certainly be a good choice.

However, you don’t have to spend a lot of money on an expensive machine to make excellent-quality ice cream at home. The Cuisinart ICE30 makes ice cream that is comparable in quality to the Musso Polla 5030 and is an excellent machine for the home cook on a budget.

What you are paying for on the Musso Polla 5030 is 1. the impressive in-built compressor; and 2. the impressive 1.5 litre, or 2 quart, freezer bowl.

The in-built compressor can freeze a 1000g batch in about 13 minutes and a 1500g batch in about 25 minutes. This relatively short residence time (or the time the mix spends in the machine) contributes to the development of smooth and creamy ice cream by promoting the formation of small ice crystals: the longer a mix spends in a machine, the larger the ice crystals are likely to grow and the sandier the texture is likely to be.

Having an in-built compressor also means that you can make batch after batch of ice cream. This is a big advantage over machine like the Cuisinart ICE 30 that don’t have an in-built compressor and require the bowl to be frozen overnight before you can make a batch of ice cream.

This machine is, however, by no means perfect. The burning rubber smell and the central pin issue are certainly two points that could be improved and need to be kept on top of.

If you are a home cook looking for an ice cream machine with an in-built compressor at a more reasonable price, I would recommend either the Cuisinart ICE100 or the Breville BCI600XL Smart Scoop. Both make excellent-quality ice cream that is dense, smooth, and creamy. If you are a seasoned ice cream maker or need to make a lot of ice cream at home AND money isn’t an issue, then I would certainly recommend the Musso Pola 5030.

If you found this review helpful and are thinking of buying the Musso Polla 5030, you can support the blog by using the link below to buy your machine from the chaps at amazon.

Hope that review helps.

All the best, Ruben

Pros

  • Powerful in-built compressor that can churn a 1000g batch in about 12 minutes.
  • Impressive 1.5 litre, or 2 quart, capacity.
  • All stainless steel finish.
  • Stainless steel dasher.
  • Quiet.

Cons

  • Ridiculously expensive.
  • The central pin issue.
  • A burning rubber smell after about 26 minutes when you churn a large 1500g batch.

 

Why are stabilizers used in ice cream?

Stabilizers in Ice CreamWhat are ice cream stabilizers?

Stabilizers are hydrocolloids that are water-soluble, i.e. they disperse in water, and are commonly used in ice cream making. Stabilizers extensively used in the ice cream industry include guar gum, locust bean gum, carboxy, ethyl cellulose (CMC), sodium and propyleneglycol alginates, xanthan, gelatin, and carrageenan (Goff and Hartel, 2013).

These stabilizers are derived from plants, bacteria, and animal by-products. Although derived from natural sources, stabilizers are considered food additives under European law.

Plants

Most stabilizers used in ice cream making are of plant origin. These include sodium alginate (E401) extracted from brown seaweeds, carrageenans (E407) extracted from red seaweeds, locust bean gum (E410) and guar gum (E412) extracted from tree seeds, pectin (E440) extracted from citrus peel and apple pomace, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) (E466) extracted from cotton and wood pulp, and sodium (E401) and propylene glycol (E477) alginates extracted from kelp.

Bacteria

Xanthan (E415), a bacterial polysacharide produced by the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris, is used as a stabilizer in ice cream making.

Animal by-products

Gelatin (E441), a polypeptide of animal origin (mostly from bones, bovine hides, and pig skin) is also used as a stabilizer.

Gelatin was traditionally used as a stabilizer in ice cream making but has now largely been replaced by polysaccharide hydrocolloids in ice cream making.

So we know that stabilizers are food additives that are derived from plants, bacteria, and animal by-products.  Let’s turn now to why stabilizers are used in ice cream making.

Why are stabilizers added to ice cream?

So just why are stabilizers added to ice cream? According to Goff and Hartel (2013), the primary purposes for using stabilizers in ice cream are to:

  • increase mix viscosity;
  • retard ice crystal and lactose crystal growth during storage;
  • help prevent shrinkage of the ice cream during storage and
  • reduce the rate of meltdown.

Let’s look at each of these points individually.

Increase mix viscosity

Mix viscosity can be loosely defined as the thickness of the ice cream mix. Generally speaking, the thicker and more viscous a mix is, the better the texture is likely to be.

A certain level of viscosity is also essential for proper whipping and retention of air that is incorporated during the churning process, and for good body and texture in the ice cream (Goff and Hartel, 2013).

Increasing the concentration of stabilizer, protein, fat, and total solids in a mix will increase viscosity, with stabilizers having the greatest effect on mix viscosity (Goff and hartel, 2013).

Concentrating a mix by evaporating some of the water will also increase mix viscosity. I have found that heating a mix at around 71.4°C for 60 minutes denatures whey proteins, which contributes significantly to smooth and creamy texture, and also increases mix viscosity thus reducing the need for stabilizers.

Retard ice crystal growth during storage

All ice cream will eventually become sandy and coarse as the ice crystals grow during storage. Small ice crystals, essential for smooth and creamy texture and developed during the whipping process, will eventually grow into large crystals that are detectable on the tongue. These crystals can be easily seen when you open an ice cream tub that has been left in the freezer for months and find large bits of ice on your ice cream.

Stabilizers are added to ice cream to slow down the rate at which ice crystals grow during storage. Stabilizers retard ice crystal growth by slowing the rate of diffusion of water to the surfaces of growing crystals (Goff and Hartel, 2013).

Although stabilizers keep ice crystals smaller for longer during storage, they actually have little (Caldwell et al., 1992) or no (Sutton and Wilcox, 1998a,b) impact on the ice crystal size distribution in ice cream right after it has been churned in the machine and also little or no impact on initial ice crystal growth during quiescent freezing and hardening (Flores and Goff, 1999a), but they do limit the rate of growth of ice crystals during recrystalisation (Flores and Goff, 1999b).

So, we know that small ice crystals are essential for smooth and creamy texture (see my post on ice crystal size effect on texture). Stabilizers do not have an effect on the size of ice crystals at the time the ice cream is churned in the machine. This means that adding stabilizers will not promote the formation of small ice crystals when the ice cream is made.

Ice crystals will grow over time and the bigger they grow, the sandier the texture becomes. The longer ice cream is left in the freezer, the bigger ice crystals grow. Stabilizers are added to retard this ice crystal growth so that the texture stays smoother for longer.

Because stabilizers do not have an effect on ice crystal size when ice cream is made, ice cream that is freshly made and eaten within a short time does not really need added stabilizers. Stabilizers are mainly added to ice cream to increase its shelf life in the supermarket by keeping ice crystals smaller for longer. That is why you rarely find added stabilizers in good ice cream parlours where the ice cream is freshly made, consumed within a short period of time after it has been made, and not stored for long periods of time.

Help prevent shrinkage of the ice cream during storage

Shrinkage can be seen in ice cream that has been stored for long periods of time and has contracted or ‘deflated’ so that it no longer touches the sides or the lid of the container. Shrinkage is sometimes noticeable when you open an ice cream tub that has been left in the freezer for a while and notice that it has deflated and looks somewhat flat.

Shrinkage results from a loss of air bubbles as they come together and begin to form continuous channels, eventually leading to collapse of the product itself into the channels (Turan et al., 1999). Stabilizers are added to ice cream to slow down the rate of shrinkage.

Reduce the rate of meltdown

The melting rate of ice cream is of great importance; no one likes an ice cream that quickly turns to slush as you are eating it.

Added stabilizers increase the melting resistance of ice cream due to their water-holding and microviscosity enhancement ability (Goff and Hartel, 2013).

Ice Cream defects caused by stabilizers

Although stabilizers have many beneficial functions in ice cream, too much stabilizer can have adverse effects on texture. These include a gummy or sticky texture that is often slow to melt and a heavy or putty-like texture.

Conclusion

Although stabilizers have many beneficial effects on ice cream, I have found that extremely smooth and creamy ice cream can be made at home without the need for added stabilizers.

The beneficial effects of added stabilizers can be easily achieved by heating a mix to somewhere around 71.4°C and keeping it there for 60 minutes. This increases mix viscosity and improves the water-holding capacity of protein.

The increased milkfat used in home made ice cream also plays a similar role to added stabilizers in that it will retard or reduce the rate at which ice crystals grow during storage, keeping the smooth and creamy texture for longer.

I still maintain that these food additives should not be used in ice cream and that the main reason they are added to commercial ice cream is to allow companies to keep their ice cream on supermarket shelves for longer. Because us home-made ice cream enthusiasts devour our home-made ice cream in a matter of days, we don’t need to store it in the freezer for months and months and do not, therefore, need to add stabilizers.

I hope that helps.

All the best, Ruben.

References:

Bahramparvar, M. and M Tehrani. 2011. Application and functions of stabilizers in ice cream, Food Reviews International, 27:4, 389-407

Caldwell, K. and D. Goff, and D. Stanley, 1992. A low temperature scanning electron microscopy study of ice cream. 1. Techniques and general microstructure. Food Struc. 11:1-9

Clarke, C., The Science of Ice Cream, 2004

Flores, A. and D. Goff 1999a. Ice crystal size distributions in dynamically frozen model solutions and ice cream as affected by stabilizers. J. Dairy Sci. 82:1399-1407.

Flores, A. and D. Goff, 1999b. Recrystallisation in ice cream after constant and cycling temperature storage conditions as affected by stabilizers. J. Dairy Sci. 82:1408-1415

Goff, D. and R. Hartel, Ice Cream, Seventh Edition, 2013

Sutton, R. and J. Wilcox, 1998a. Recrystallisation in model ice cream solutions as affected by stabilizer concentration, J. Food Science. 63:9-11

Sutton, R. and J. Wilcox, 1998b. Recrystallisation in ice cream as affected by stabilizers. J. Food Science. 63:104-197

Turan, S. and R Bee. 1999. Measurement of gas phase morphology in ice cream. In Bubbles in Food, pp. 183-189.

Cuisinart ICE-100 Ice Cream and Gelato Maker – Review

Cuisinart ICE 100A BIG improvement on the ICE-50

I wrote a blog post a while ago discussing the shortcomings of the Cuisinart ICE-50. It looks like the chaps at Cuisinart have acted on customer feedback and launched an upgrade; the ICE-100.

The first improvement is the noise level. Whereas the grinding and squeaking of the ICE-50 could be heard for miles and miles, the ICE-100 is much quitter and you can easily sit in the same room with the machine churning away. I still don’t think noise level in an ice cream machine is really that important and shouldn’t be taken into consideration when buying a machine; I am more interested in the quality of the ice cream. However, this was an issue many customers had with the ICE-50 and one that Cuisinart has, in my opinion, addressed. The motor arm has also been moved underneath the bowl. This gives the machine more power to drive the dasher and I didn’t have the problem of the dasher sticking when the mix began to freeze that I had with the ICE-50.

Cuisinart ICE 100A best seller?

It doesn’t always follow that a best selling item is a quality one (Da Vinci Code) but I still think that it is useful to look at what other ice cream enthusiasts are up to when deciding which ice cream machine to invest in. The ICE 100 is currently 4th in amazon’s ice cream machines best sellers list. Here is a list of the top 10 best selling ice cream machines on amazon.com:

  1. Cuisinart ICE 30BC Pure Indulgence 2-Quart Automatic Frozen Yogurt, Sorbet, and Ice Cream Maker
  2. Cuisinart ICE-21 Frozen Yogurt, Ice Cream, & Sorbet Maker
  3. Nostalgia Electrics ICMP400BLUE 4-Quart Electric Ice Cream Maker
  4. Cuisinart ICE-100 Compressor Ice Cream and Gelato Maker
  5. Cuisinart ICE-45 Mix It In Soft Serve 1-1/2-Quart Ice Cream Maker, Whitev
  6. Hamilton Beach 68330R 4-Quart Automatic Ice-Cream Maker, White
  7. MaxiMatic EIM-506 Elite Gourmet 6-Quart Old-Fashioned Pine-Bucket Electric/Manual Ice-Cream Maker
  8. DeLonghi GM6000 Gelato Maker with Self-Refrigerating Compressor
  9. Lello Musso Pola 5030 Desert Maker
  10. Lello 4080 Musso Lussino 1.5-Quart Ice Cream Maker
Ice cream and gelato paddle

The ICE-100 comes with both an ice cream and a gelato paddle. The idea is that because of its shape, the gelato paddle will incorporate less air into the ice cream during the churning process and make a dense ice cream with about 30% overrun. The ice cream paddle will incorporate slightly more air and will make an ice cream that is slightly lighter in texture.

During testing, I found that the gelato paddle made excellent ice cream with creamy, dense texture, which I preferred to the lighter ice cream made using the ice cream paddle. Both the ice cream and the gelato paddle made batches that were extremely smooth and creamy.

The 1.5 litre removable bowl

My only complaint about this machine is that I would have liked to have seen the same 2-litre bowl found in the ICE-30 in the ICE-100. The 1.5 litre removable bowl allows you to make no more than a litre of ice cream in one batch. The advantage of having a machine with an in-built compressor is that you can make batch-after-batch of ice cream without the need to freeze the bowl overnight. You will have to prepare each batch individually though, which will take more time. This remains the only issue I have with the machine. I would still like to see a 2 litre removable bowl on a future machine with an in-built compressor.

Cuisinart ICE 100 Cuisinart ICE 100Churning time

It took about 40 minutes for the machine to churn a batch of ice cream and get the temperature down to around -5°C. You can serve the ice cream directly after the machine finished churning but the consistency will resemble something similar to soft-serve ice cream and will melt relatively quickly. Commercial ice cream is served at around -15°C and I would recommend placing your ice cream in the freezer for about 4 hours after it has been churned. This will give the ice cream a firmer and more scoopable texture. The 40 minute freezing time isn’t bad and is one of the fastest for a machine with an in-built compressor, although not as good as the 20-22 minutes it takes the ICE-30 to freeze a 1 litre batch (a commercial Emery Thompson ice cream machine takes about 8 minutes to churn a batch of ice cream). The time it takes for a machine to churn a batch is very important as the longer a batch spends in a machine, the bigger the ice crystals are likely to grow and the sandier the texture is likely to be. I would strongly recommend switching the machine on and leaving it running with the bowl in place for about 15 minutes before you add the mix. This will freeze the bowl and help to increase heat transfer from the mix to the bowl, which will in turn mean that the mix is frozen quicker. The quicker you can freeze your batch of ice cream, the smaller the ice crystals are likely to be and the creamier the texture.

Appearance and cleaning

The machine comes in a nice stainless steel finish and isn’t an eye sore in the kitchen. It is a fairly large machine so you will need some room in your kitchen to store it. Cleaning the machine is very easy as the bowl and dasher are the only things that come in contact with the machine and are both easily removed.

Ice cream quality

As with any ice cream machine, the most important characteristic should always be the quality of the finished ice cream. The ICE-100 is the only machine with an in-built compressor that I have tried that makes excellent ice cream with a smooth, creamy, and dense texture. The ICE-100 is also the only machine I have tried that makes ice cream comparable in quality to that made in my beloved ICE-30. I didn’t try any of the recipes that came with the machine so I can’t say that it will always make excellent ice cream. A good ice cream mix is just as important as a good machine. You can use the best machine in the world but if you don’t have a good ice cream mix, the texture is still likely to be sandy and grainy. I used my Roasted Almond Ice Cream recipe when I tested this machine. The recipe does involve a lot of work but the smooth and creamy results are, I think, makes the sweat and tears worth it.

Cuisinart ICE 100Conclusion 

So, would I recommend this machine? Absolutely. I still think that machines with an in-built compressor simply aren’t worth the extra money because you can make excellent ice cream in the cheaper ICE-30 model that doesn’t have an in-built compressor. I appreciate that compressor machines are more convenient to use and allow you to make batch after batch but I still don’t think these machines are worth the extra money. The ICE-30 still remains my number 1 machine and I recommend it every time someone asks me for a recommendation. However, if you are set on buying a machine with an in-built compressor, the ICE-100 is the only compressor machine that I have tried that makes ice cream comparable in quality to that made using the ICE-30. If you don’t mind freezing your bowl overnight before making your ice cream and are interested in making only one batch at a time, definitely go for the ICE-30 at more than half the price of the ICE-100. If money is not an issue and if you are looking for a convenient machine with an in-built compressor that will make batch-after-batch, I would certainly recommend the ICE-100.

If you found this review helpful and are thinking about buying the Cuisinart ICE-100 Compressor Ice Cream and Gelato Maker, you can support the blog by purchasing your machine from the chaps at amazon.com using the link below. All orders are processed and delivered by those chaps at amazon.

Pros
  • Excellent smooth and creamy ice cream texture.
  • 2 paddles; a gelato paddle that incorporates less air and makes a denser ice cream and an ice cream paddle that incorporates more air and makes a slightly lighter ice cream.
  • In-built compressor means that you don’t have to freeze your bowl overnight before making your ice cream. This is also good if you intend on making a lot of ice cream for a party or large group. I recommend switching the machine on and leaving it to chill the bowl for 15 minutes before you add your mix.
  • Nice stainless steel finish.
  • Quieter than the ICE-50.
 Cons
  • Still no 2 litre bowl. The 1.5 litre bowl allows you to make no more than 1 litre at a time.
  • More than twice the price of the ICE-30.

My Top 7 Ice Cream and Food Science Books

 
Hi guys! I’ve had a lot of e-mails asking what books I use for recipes and research so I’ve decided to compile a list of the books that I have found most useful and why. Hope it helps.

1. Ice cream by Douglas Goff and Richard W Hartel

This is, in my opinion, the most comprehensive book on the science behind ice cream making and has formed the backbone of my research. Professor Goff is a Professor of Food Science at the University of Guelph, Canada. Professor Hartel is a Professor of Food Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, U.S.A.

It is certainly a must-read for any ice cream enthusiast but isn’t the type of book you can easily browse through. It is a heavy read and requires patience to get through. I wouldn’t recommend this book if you are after a brief introduction to the science behind ice cream making. Instead, I would recommend On Food and Cooking: the Science and lore of the Kitchen by Harold McGee.

Ice Cream by Goff and Hartel is more for those who have been making ice cream at home for a while and want an in-depth understanding of the process and the science involved. It has an excellent section on formulating your own ice cream recipes for those who are ready and keen to play around with ingredients and quantities. This book is a must-read for anyone considering starting an ice cream business.

The book includes recipes aimed at commercial ice cream makers and has not been written with the home ice cream maker in mind.

2. Ice Cream and Frozen Deserts: A commercial guide to Production and Marketing by Malcom Stogo

This book is primarily aimed at those wanting to set up and run an ice cream business. It provides a good introduction on the commercial equipment needed, sanitary conditions, bringing the product to market, as well as on ice cream production and recipes.

I wouldn’t recommend this book for the home ice cream chef because of its price and because it lacks interesting recipes that you can try at home. I would recommend this only to those who are thinking of starting an ice cream business.

3. Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking by Dr Nathan Myhrvold and Maxime Bilet

Written by the former Chief Technology Officer at Microsoft, Modernist Cuisine is an excellent source for the science behind cooking. It is an invaluable source of information for anyone who is passionate about molecular gastronomy and wants to understand the intricacies and the science. It has an excellent chapter on flavour extraction and another on vacuum reduction, which I have found pertinent to ice cream making.

I have used this book extensively in my  research and would most certainly recommend it. It is an expensive and dense book and so probably not the best buy if you are only after basic ice cream recipes. I would recommend On Food and Cooking: the Science and lore of the Kitchen by Harold McGee as a starting point before investing in Modernist Cuisine. These guys have also released a cheaper version catering for the home cook, Modernist Cuisine at Home but I haven’t yet given this a try.

4. Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home by Jeni Britton Bauer

Written by the founder of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams, this book has a plethora of interesting and unique ice cream flavours. Jeni takes a unique approach to ice cream making in that she uses cornstarch, cream cheese, and corn syrup to make her ice creams. Packed full of vibrant pictures, detailed step-by-step instructions on making ice cream, and a nice introduction to the science behind ice cream making, this is certainly a must-read for anyone looking to improve their ice cream making at home.

5. On Food and Cooking: the Science and Lore of the Kitchen by Harold McGee

Another must-read for any home cook. An excellent introduction to the science behind cooking with an easy-to-read section on ice cream. I would recommend this as a good starting point for anyone interested the science behind cooking. It isn’t solely a book on ice cream but does cover the main points on the science behind ice cream making.

It doesn’t include ice cream recipes and focuses solely on the science and history of cooking.

6. Sweet Cream and Sugar Cones: 90 Recipes for Making Your Own Ice Cream and Frozen Treats from Bi-Rite Creamery by Kris Hoogerhyde and Anne Walker

Written by the owners of the legendary Bi-Rite Creamery in San Francisco, this book is packed with interesting  recipes, including the legendary salted caramel. Another valuable resource for recipes, with vibrant pictures and a step-by-step guide that walks you through the ice cream making process.

It has a good introduction section to ice cream making but doesn’t focus on the science. A good resource for anyone starting out as an ice cream maker.

7. The Fat Duck Cookbook by Heston Blumenthal

Written by world renowned chef Heston Blumenthal, this another excellent resource for anyone interested in molecular gastronomy. Packed full of detail on the science behind taste and food chemistry with an excellent section on the science behind ice cream making.

Like Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking, this book is not for those looking for quick, simple recipes. The recipes in this book are complicated and time consuming and aimed at the professional chef. It has an excellent section that discusses published essays on food science.

I would recommend this book as an excellent source on food science and perfect for those who like to sit down with a highlighter as they read.

If you found this post helpful and are thinking of buying a book on ice cream, you can support me by clicking on the links on this page and buying your books from the chaps at amazon.com.

Hope that helps,

Ruben

Ice Cream Adventures! Fried ice cream in Kuwait!

 
This was my first encounter with fried ice cream! The vanilla ice cream came encased in fried cornflakes covered in a delicious cinnamon and ginger sauce. I was expecting the outer layer of cornflakes to be warm but this was sadly not to. The hard and crispy outer layer did contrast well with the smooth ice cream though.

Definitely a recipe for me to get my head around and hopefully put up on the blog sometime soon!

Fried Ice CreamFried Ice Cream (3)Fried Ice Cream (2)